Africa Fashion Week London 2019 – Pinterest Image Collection

With the countdown to Africa Fashion Week London 2019 well underway, I thought this would be a good opportunity to invite you to visit my Pinterest board – Africa Fashion Week London 2019.

Screenshot AFWL 2019 pinterest | champagne twist

 

This collection of 100s of photographs has been especially collated for this year’s show, with more added each day.  With a wealth of ideas, influences and imagery, it will surely get you in the mood to strut your stuff, ready for this Summer’s event.

So why not visit the AFWL board and maybe share some of your own fashion images too.

Countdown to Africa Fashion Week London | Champagne Twist

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Photo source/credit : AFWL

AFWL 2019

If you love fashion, then clear your designer diaries for Africa Fashion Week London, August 9-10, 2019.

SAVE THE DATE

9-10 August 2019
Freemasons’ Hall
60 Great Queen Street
London WC2B 5AZ

Doors open from 1pm for Exhibition browsing and entertainment

Friday Catwalk Shows: 5pm & 7pm
Saturday Catwalk Shows: 3pm, 5pm & 7pm

To purchase tickets, click the link here.

Twist Teas: Strawberry Rose review | Champagne Twist

The Tea Twist Taste Test – Twist Teas : Strawberry & Rose | Champagne Twist

Twist Teas: Strawberry Rose review | Champagne Twist
Twist Teas: Strawberry Rose review | Champagne Twist

Today, I’m moving away from black based teas and tying out a more fruity and floral number. Twist Teas Strawberry and Rose tea is today’s subject tea for review.

Twist Teas: Strawberry Rose review | Champagne Twist
Twist Teas: Strawberry Rose | Champagne Twist

Strawberry and Rose contains a list of delicious sounding ingredients – Chinese White tea, apple pieces, rose hip, hibiscus, freeze dried strawberry, elderflower, orange blossom, rose petals and orange peel.

This is a tea to be served without milk, but can be cold brewed as well as make a hot beverage.

Twist Teas: Strawberry Rose review | Champagne Twist
Twist Teas: Strawberry Rose review | Champagne Twist

Out the pack, the tea has a lovely aroma, and when hot brewed develops into a beautiful pink hue. I would serve this at an afternoon tea as an alternative to black tea.

Twist Teas: Strawberry Rose review | Champagne Twist
Twist Teas: Strawberry Rose review | Champagne Twist

Cold brewed ‘Strawberry and Rose’ makes a light and refreshing drink, ideal for a summer time soiree. I reckon made with sparkling water, with sliced fresh strawberries and a slice of lemon, it would make a great non-alcoholic drink.

Twist Teas: Strawberry Rose review | Champagne Twist
Twist Teas: Strawberry Rose review | Champagne Twist

With all the wonderful ingredients, I was surprised that I couldn’t detect any rose or strawberry during the taste test. It was more of a general fruity flavour, pleasant as it was, rather than a strawberry or floral blast.

Rating : 3.5 out of 5.

 

For more information check out these links:

Twist Teas – https://www.twist-teas.co.uk

National Tea Day – https://www.nationalteaday.co.uk

FesTeaVal 2019 day 1 highlights – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mtEwh6YFXdA

FesTeaVal 2019 day 2 highlights – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pPQQ5lvwifU

FesTeaVal 2019 review – TBC

 

Next review : Twist Teas ‘Mint Choc Chip’.

 

The Tea Twist Taste Test – Twist Teas : Breakfast Boost | Champagne Twist

5T Breakfast Boost

Yesterday, I tested the first of the Twist Teas tasting menu, ‘Afternoon Perks’.  Today, it’s the turn of ‘Breakfast Boost’.

Breakfast Boost by Twist Teas | Champagne Twist - The Tea Twist Taste Test
The Tea Twist Taste Test – Twist Teas: Breakfast Boost – Champagne Twist review

Like ‘Afternoon Perks’, ‘Breakfast Boost’ includes Sri Lankan black tea, as well as Indian Assam Black tea, Yerba Mate (1) and Siberian Ginseng (2). The tea can be enjoyed with or without milk.

(1) Yerba mate is used to make a beverage known as mate. When served cold, the drink is called tereré in Guaraní. It is traditionally consumed in central and southern regions of South America, primarily in Paraguay, as well as in Argentina, Uruguay, southern and central-western Brazil, the Chaco region of Bolivia and southern Chile.[3] It is also popular in the Druze community in Syria and Lebanon, where it is imported from Argentina.[4] Yerba mate was first cultivated and used by the indigenous Guaraní people and in some Tupí communities in southern Brazil, prior to European colonization. Yerba mate can be found in various energy drinks on the market, as well as being sold as a bottled or canned iced tea.

Yerba mate has been claimed to have various effects on human health and these effects have been attributed to the high quantity of polyphenols found in mate tea.[22] Research has found that yerba mate may improve allergy symptoms[27] and reduce the risk of diabetes mellitus and high blood sugar in mice.[28]

Mate also contains compounds that act as an appetite suppressant and possible weight loss tool,[29] increases mental energy and focus,[30] improves mood,[31][32] and promotes deeper sleep; however, sleep may be negatively affected in people who are sensitive to caffeine.[30]

Before 2011, there were no double-blind, randomized prospective clinical trials of yerba mate consumption with respect to chronic disease.[33] However, many studies have been conducted since then, pointing to at least some probable benefits from some claims, such as reduction of fat cells, inflammation and cholesterol, although more research is needed.[32] Some non-blinded studies have found mate consumption to be effective in lipid lowering.[33] Another study determined that mate reduces progression of artheriosclerosis in rabbits but did not decrease serum cholesterol or aortic TBARS and antioxidant enzymes.[34]

Source : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yerba_mate

(2) Some people use Siberian ginseng to improve athletic performance and the ability to do work. They also use it to treat sleep problems (insomnia) and the symptoms of infections caused by herpes simplex type 2. It is also used to boost the immune system, prevent colds, and increase appetite.

Source : https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-985/ginseng-siberian

Perhaps it’s the high caffeine content, that this tea reminds me of a builder’s tea, only posher. In terms of flavour it packs a punch. The black teas provide a strong, yet pleasant taste, and is ideal, I imagine, served with a wide range of breakfast styles, from traditional full English to Swiss muesli to pancakes with fresh fruit and yogurt, or on its own to set you up for the day ahead.

The Tea Twist Taste Test – Twist Teas: Breakfast Boost – Champagne Twist review
The Tea Twist Taste Test – Twist Teas: Breakfast Boost – Champagne Twist review

Personally, I would drink this tea with milk, although if you like strong black teas, or require it for baking, the Breakfast Boost should work well.

The Tea Twist Taste Test – Twist Teas: Breakfast Boost – Champagne Twist review
The Tea Twist Taste Test – Twist Teas: Breakfast Boost, with milk – Champagne Twist review

I really enjoyed ‘Breakfast Boost’, and would be keen to conduct cooking experiments with it. I think it could add a unique flavour profile to, for instance, tea breads or cakes.

 

Rating: 4 out of 5

 

For more information check out these links:

Twist Teas – https://www.twist-teas.co.uk

National Tea Day – https://www.nationalteaday.co.uk

FesTeaVal 2019 day 1 highlights – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mtEwh6YFXdA

FesTeaVal 2019 day 2 highlights – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pPQQ5lvwifU

FesTeaVal 2019 review – TBC

 

Next review : Twist Teas ‘Strawberry and Rose’.

 

Twist Teas Afternoon Perks - Champagne Twist review

The Tea Twist Taste Test – Twist Teas : Afternoon Perks | Champagne Twist

Twist Teas Afternoon Perks - Champagne Twist review
The Tea Twist Taste Test – Twist Teas Afternoon Perks – Champagne Twist review

Yesterday (Sunday 21st April 2019)  was Easter Sunday and National Tea Day. A double celebration for those who, like me, love tea.

Today, I kick off a new blog series, called The Tea Twist Taste Test, where I taste and review a number of teas from new and established brands. Most of the brands I will feature, I discovered, or in some cases rediscovered, at the recent FesTeaVal event run by National Tea Day.  The first brand in this series is Twist Teas  (love the brand name already!), which has been producing a wide range of teas for 3 years. The first tea I’m taste testing is ‘Afternoon Perks’, from their Whole Leaf Tasting Menu.

Twist Teas Afternoon Perks - Champagne Twist review
The Tea Twist Taste Test – Twist Teas Afternoon Perks – Champagne Twist review

Made with Indian Darjeeling and Sri Lankan black teas and Gotu Kola, ‘Afternoon Perks’ can be drunk with for without milk.

Gotu Kola is used for fatigue, anxiety, depression, psychiatric disorders, Alzheimer’s disease, and improving memory and intelligence. Other uses include wound healing, trauma, and circulation problems (venous insufficiency) including varicose veins, and blood clots in the legs.

Source : https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-753/gotu-kola

I found the tea refreshing in both formats, although I slightly prefer the tea black, with maybe a lemon slice. Just as the ‘twisting notes’ on the tasting menu pack claimed, the tea was energy boosting, after a busy morning in the garden.

Twist Teas - Afternoon Perks by Champagne Twist - without milk
The Tea Twist Taste Test – Twist Teas Afternoon Perks – Champagne Twist

I like the idea of including Gotu Kola in the blend, as I feel it helped with my fatigue. I wonder, with prolonged use, if it would prove to be a good memory boosting aid. Regardless, the tea tastes lovely, and is ideal as a post- noon pick me up. I will certainly be adding this to my collection.

Rating: 4 out of 5

Twist Teas – https://www.twist-teas.co.uk

National Tea Day – https://www.nationalteaday.co.uk

FesTeaVal 2019 day 1 highlights – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mtEwh6YFXdA

FesTeaVal 2019 day 2 highlights – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pPQQ5lvwifU

FesTeaVal 2019 review – TBC

Next review : Twist Teas ‘Breakfast Boost’

 

Caribbean Food Week Festival 2018 – Review​ | Champagne​ Twist

Caribbean Food Week Festival 2018 Review

Was the Caribbean Food Week Festival 2018 about authentic Caribbean food, or just Jamaican Jerk?

Caribbean food month, August 2018, Champagne Twist

Continuing with Caribbean Food Month on Champagne Twist, last Saturday, I visited the Caribbean Food Week Festival at the new venue, Bernie Spain Gardens, on the Thames’ South Bank.

If you love Jerk Chicken, Curried Goat or Rice and Peas, the Caribbean Food Week Festival was a celebration of these 3 dishes, but if you wanted to learn about authentic Caribbean Cuisine, the menu was disappointing.

 

Bernie Spain Gardens Southbank - Caribbean Food Week Festival 2018 | Champagne Twist

The Bernie Spain Gardens on the South Bank of the River Thames hosted the 2-day weekend food festival, just ahead of the London Carnival. Sadly, the opportunity to showcase the regions vast cuisines was missed and gave a poor overall impression of Caribbean Food.

In the age of plant-based diets, I was extremely disappointed not to see much of the fresh fruit and vegetables the Caribbean has to offer. Worse of all, the event was billed as a colourful celebration of Caribbean food, yet the main colours showcased, green, black and yellow, were that of the Jamaican flag.

JFB Jerk Grill - Caribbean Food Week Festival 2018 | Champagne Twist

It is now clear to me why so many people in the UK believe that Jamaica is the Caribbean and the Caribbean is Jamaica. The confusion is not helped when only 3 dishes from 1 island seemed to be ‘celebrated’, and the opportunity to sell fresh Caribbean fruit and veg was missed.

Officials from the Voice newspaper stall gave away an African and Caribbean restaurant guide, which was a great idea. I was also given a bag of free literature, including a newspaper from June and a magazine celebrating African heritage from October 2016. A two-year old magazine which didn’t even reference Caribbean food. I was also informed that they had run out of literature to give to patrons, shocking as the show started at 11am and before noon, they had run out. This hardly gave a positive impression.

Caribbean Food Week Festival 2018 | Champagne Twist

Reading the phrase “Caribbean food’, I had expected examples of cuisine from each or at least the majority of the countries within the Caribbean. So when 95% of the available food was Jamaican based, of which 80% consisted of Jerk chicken, Curry goat and Rice and Peas, it did nothing to counteract the image of Caribbean food being limited.

Jerk Hot sauces - Caribbean Food Week Festival 2018 | Champagne Twist

There seems to be a sense of ‘protectionism’ over this cuisine, while understandable due to the historical exploitation of the region, the time has come for the Caribbean to promote its own food in an age when Western cultures are crying out for organic, pure food and drinks. Gone are the days when sugar was the cash crop. Coconut is now the superfood of choice, yet the majority of coconut products, despite the abundance, doesn’t come from the Caribbean.

I have often wondered, with its huge variety, and abundant fruit and vegetables, unique meat and world famous seafood, why Caribbean food isn’t that well known in the UK. This event goes some way to answering that question.

Referencing a tiny selection of Jamaican cuisine as representative of Caribbean cuisine not only limits people expectations of Jamaica food, it limits and potentially damages the reputation of all the countries within the region.

For vegetarians, it was almost impossible to find anything suitable to eat.  I ended up with a dish consisting of Halloumi, fries and jerk sauce.  While it was lovely, it was hardly a showcase of Caribbean food, especially when only 1 element of the dish, the jerk sauce, could be attributed to the region.  Good luck to you if you’re a vegan! There were tofu sausages available on one stall, but not all vegetarians or vegans like or eat tofu.

Grace Foods stall - Caribbean Food Week Festival 2018 | Champagne Twist

I also hoped to listen to experts discussing Caribbean food and drink in relation to health, particularly in the wake of Dr Karin’s speech remarking the coconut oil is ‘pure poison’.  Although, I was pleased that Grace Foods, the event’s hosts had provided a number of recipe leaflets, which included drinks and some plant-based recipes.

Chef Solomon Smith, Brixton Soup Kitchen Charity - Caribbean Food Week Festival 2018 | Champagne Twist
Chef Solomon Smith with host Nicola, Caribbean Food Week Festival, Bernie Spain Gardens, South Bank, London

The cooking demonstrations were also interesting and proved to be the highlight of the festival, but again more should and could have been made of this. Over the weekend there are 2 different chefs, I attended the last day so was treated to 3 of the 4 live demos lead by Chef Solomon Smith. Unfortunately, the demos were meat or fish based and not vegetarian recipes. Samples were plentiful, but none were solely plant-based, which limited the number of people who could enjoy the samples.

Picnic Bench - Caribbean Food Week Festival | Champagne Twist

The 3 picnic benches were beautifully painted, to encourage people to actually sit down and eat, but more benches should have been provided. A few large parasols wouldn’t have gone amiss, providing shade from the sun, or the rain, yet still keeping visitors in the area and providing relatively low-cost advertising.

Brixton Soup Kitchen charity van - Caribbean Food Week Festival 2018 | Champagne Twist

In the middle of the space was a large grey vehicle, which many thought was a delivery van. Naturally many thought it should have been moved prior to the start of the festival.  As it turns out, the van was there to help promote the Brixton Soup Kitchen, a charity which feeds and assists homeless people in the area. I am curious as to why there was no signage, or anyone standing by the van to explain the vehicle or the charity.  It was only when I attended the cooking demos, that the situation was made somewhat clearer. More of this in a later post.

Brixton Soup Kitchen - Caribbean Food Week Festival 2018 | Champagne Twist

Brixton Soup Kitchen Chef Solomon Smith charity van - Caribbean Food Week Festival 2018 | Champagne Twist

Travel companies missed a trick by not taking advantage of holiday seekers. There was one stall for people wishing to purchase or hire overseas property, but only for Jamaica, yet again, limiting choice.

The festival is now in its 3rd year, so still in its infancy. Previously held in Brixton, the move to the Bernie Spain Gardens was a stroke of genius, as the location is more central, making it more accessible for patrons, and taking advantage of a beautiful wide open space, flanked by the Thames, and a beautiful floral oasis, with multicultural art galleries, restaurants and shopping in the form of the OXO Tower and the Gabriel’s Wharf.

It usually takes at least 5 years or so for such events to become established, so I still have high hopes. A little fine tuning supported by the services from a good PR company, actively promoting all or least as many of the countries within the Caribbean, more emphasis on fresh produce, and celebrating the health benefits of the product, the festival could the late summer fixture, and the essential prelude to the Notting Hill Carnival.

Heck, all they need to bring on the colour is a flag display from all the countries in the region and maybe a few poster maps, establish a few fun and educational games (other than just a big Connect 4 and a few bean bags) for the kids, some fresh produce stalls and you have a true celebratory family-oriented festival. More live music wouldn’t go amiss, the obligatory steel pan band imagery is getting a little stale.

bean bags green black yellow Jamaica - Caribbean Food Week Festival 2018 | Champagne Twist

In fairness, for a free event, it’s not bad and such food festivals should be encouraged. There are a number of fundamental changes that need to be made over the next 2 years, if the festival has any chance of creating a movement that sustains and actively promotes the food of the Caribbean. Granted, the organiser of the festival is a Jamaican based company, so naturally, they are going to promote their country of origin. But that should not be at the near total expense of the other Caribbean countries, especially when the festival is called ‘Caribbean Food’. If they continue down this path, they are just shooting themselves in the foot and risk bringing down the entire region with them.

There is more to the Caribbean than Jamaica and Jerk seasoning, it’s about time people were made aware.

Grace Food products - Caribbean Food Week Festival 2018 | Champagne Twist

 

 

Semaj’s Organic Dried Sorrel review | Champagne Twist

Hello,

Caribbean food month, August 2018, Champagne Twist

Traditionally enjoyed over the Christmas season in the West Indies, sorrel, fresh homemade sorrel that is, is a wonderful surprisingly fruity, spiced drink that is as refreshing as it is pretty in colour. Fill a glass with ice, pour the drink in, sit back and enjoy.

Sorrel drink | Champagne Twist

Which is why Semaj’s DIY pack version is such a disappointment.  Firstly, the substitution of whole cloves, an essential ingredient in for sorrel, with fennel seeds is inexcusable. If you can’t trust the ingredients list printed on the packaging, it will be difficult to trust the end product. Fennel seeds also tend to be cheaper than cloves, so it also makes me question the ‘value’ of the value pack.

That said, the product was easy to make, and adding cloves from my own spice cupboard, as well as other flavours made a difference. But having to source the spices defeats the object of buying this product.

Organic Dried Sorrel Semaj | Champagne Twist

As a quick introduction to sorrel, this drink had potential as a mixer. However as a stand-alone product, especially with the errors in the ingredients list, this drink cannot be described as authentic and in no way compares favourably with the real sorrel drink.

Rating 1 out of 5